Trump starts paying his own legal bills on Russia probe: attorneys

Trump starts paying his own legal bills on Russia probe: attorneysBy Karen Freifeld and Ginger Gibson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump has begun paying his own legal bills related to the Russia investigation and will no longer cover the costs using political donations to his re-election campaign or the Republican Party, his attorneys confirmed on Friday. Trump defense lawyer John Dowd said that following payments by the Republican National Committee, the president began paying the bills and now wants to make the party "even." The RNC confirmed it is no longer paying the bills.



Florida men found guilty of illegally transferring money from Venezuela

Florida men found guilty of illegally transferring money from VenezuelaThe owners of a Florida construction equipment exporter were convicted of illegally transferring more than $100 million from businesses largely in Venezuela to U.S. and foreign bank accounts. Luis Diaz Jr., 75, and his son, Luis Javier Diaz, 50, were found guilty late on Thursday of operating an unlicensed money transmitting business and of international money laundering by a jury in Manhattan federal court, court records showed. Prosecutors said some of the money was transferred into accounts belonging to Venezuelan government officials.



Ohio State suspends fraternity activities amid probes

Ohio State suspends fraternity activities amid probesThe public university in Columbus, which has more than 45,000 undergraduate students, said in a statement sent to campus organizations on Thursday that 11 of its 37 Interfraternity Council (IFC) chapters have been the subject of such investigations this semester alone. The university did not give details on any specific incidents.



Pentagon discloses data on sexual assault reports on military bases

Pentagon discloses data on sexual assault reports on military basesSexual assault in the military, which is defined as anything from groping to rape, is believed to be significantly higher than the number of reports. The Pentagon said it estimates that, in 2016, less than a third of service members who experienced a sexual assault reported it. According to the newly released data, a collection of U.S. bases in South Korea had a combined 211 reports of sexual assault while Norfolk had 270 reports of sexual assault in the 2016 fiscal year, which began in October 2015 and ended in September 2016.



White House seeks $44 billion hurricane aid, far short of requests

White House seeks $44 billion hurricane aid, far short of requestsBy David Shepardson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House on Friday said it had asked Congress for $44 billion in supplemental disaster assistance to help those hurt by recent hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands, far short of the aid some officials have called for. The White House said it expected to seek additional funds after a fuller analysis. U.S. Representative Frank Pallone and Senator Ron Wyden, both Democrats, called the request "a dereliction of duty by the Trump administration to American citizens in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands that need our help.





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